Tips on How to Crate Train Your Dog the Right Way

Once your dog is used with the crate, you should lock the dog inside. You can go away for a bit and watch from a distance to see how he calms down. If you see him protest, keep him inside until he calms down. Let him go only when he does. If you do this for a few days, he should be learning to enter and exit the crate on his own.

Some people don’t like crate training because they think that it resembles solitary confinement. But, if you read some of the benefits listed here, and those that are not mentioned and you might find on your own, you can easily reach the same conclusion I did, that a crate is good both for the dog and his owner.

If you train dogs or puppies enough, you can make them love it, and not consider it a place that they want to avoid. If they’re not trained, they can feel lonely and unsafe in this environment.

Crate or den training is done because dogs need a feeling of security, a place of nesting, where there aren’t any distractions. Such a home can be a den. If the right techniques are used and it’s introduced properly, crate training can be OK for dogs, and they will not consider it a punishment.

1. Benefits of using a crate.

a) When you want to be sure that your dog isn’t running around on his own, and you need him to stay put, you can use a crate to control him.

b) If they’re in a place where they feel vulnerable, a crate will provide them a safe haven.

c) A crate can be a place to rest and relax for the dog, where he can’t be distracted or bothered.

d) You can use the crate to make sure that dogs with behavioral problems are kept under control.

e) If your dog is untrained, you can keep him under control, so he doesn’t bite your guests or cause any accidents.

f) If your dog has separation anxiety a crate can help him.

g) If you need to take the dog out, a crate can keep him secure.

h) His confidence is boosted because he is more secure.

i) Can help the dog with their training, since it can be a direction for their activities.

2. Size of the crate.

You should choose a crate that allows the dog to stand up on all fours, where he can lie down or turn around without the walls being in the way. If you also want to use the crate to travel with your dog, you should pick a larger one.

If training is the only reason why you use the crate, you should still pick one that follows the rules I talked about before. Using a big crate will allow the dog to do things that are unwanted in an area of the crate where they don’t have to sit.

3. How to introduce the crate to the dog.

Introducing the crate to the dog should be done when you’re comfortable with the idea. First, choose a crate that is appropriate. Second, put it in the house, in a place where the dog can notice it. In the beginning, remove the door from the crate, so the dog can explore it for a week or so.

If he doesn’t seem interested in the crate, you can leave some food inside, to get his attention. After a few days pass, you can try giving him food inside. This way, he will learn that the crate is his and he can enter it safely.

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